John MacDonald

John MacDonald is Professor of Criminology and Sociology at the University of Pennsylvania. He holds a Ph.D. in Criminology from the University of Maryland.

Voting History

Reducing gun violence

Taking into account both potential implementation challenges and expected efficacy, investing in police-led targeted enforcement directed at places and persons at high risk for gun crime (e.g.,\"hot spot\" policing; gang enforcement) would reduce gun violence.

Vote Confidence
Strongly Agree 10
Median Survey Vote Median Survey Confidence
Agree 7
Comments

Taking into account both potential implementation challenges and expected efficacy, investing in police-led focused deterrence programs (clearly communicating “carrots and sticks” to local residents identified as high risk, followed by targeted surveillance and enforcement with some community-based support for those who desist from crime) would reduce gun violence.

Vote Confidence
Agree 8
Median Survey Vote Median Survey Confidence
Agree 6
Comments

This approach has more challenges to implementation because it requires coordination across multiple agencies and believable messaging.

Taking into account both potential implementation challenges and expected efficacy, investing in purely community-led violence-interruption programs (community-based outreach workers try to mediate and prevent conflict, without police involvement) would reduce gun violence.

Vote Confidence
Neutral/No Opinion 6
Median Survey Vote Median Survey Confidence
Neutral/No Opinion 5
Comments

The evidence is pretty thin on the efficacy of violence interruption programs on their own. At the same time they are worth trying for they provide community-lead action to try and curb violence in neighborhoods.